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into bob manning slides in california where he moved, and eventually she goes to his home which they have a right to due to inspect. and the manning's are these wonderful people who, they adopted three children from the relative whose parents were killed, and marvelous human beings. this nurse goes into bob's room and points to the wall and system why don't you have a dnr? dnr means do not resuscitate. why are you having medics tried to keep you likely have one of your of emergencies which have us all the time, in effect asking him to die. bob's wife, bob, his nurse, his doctor, all the people who saw the nurse do this and/or other actions were just appalled by this. will, well, you know, warren buffett didn't know about this and wouldn't approve of italy's. but understand what does mr. buffett said about his company's? so long as my managers make their numbers, i let them run the bases that they see fit. and it's indicative of the callousness that is going on when we don't have balance and we are so focused on profit that we literally cannot a company go and say, please die. >> host: but
in california. that the particular time. there's a whole set of circumstance that lead her to, you know, she's from the tropics, central america, you know, how did she wind up in the desert. everybody has a story in the desert how they got there. she said, [inaudible] we'll take care of you and give you a place to live shortly there after. i arrive and one of the first things i saw when i rented my shack in the sand next to a sign that said next services 100 miles, the town of 129 presiden. i felt myself to go further out. they are at the edge of beautiful national park. you know that? right. if you haven't been there. u2 album. the joshua tree. you know what it looks like. crazy arms going this way and that. well, i wanted to go further out. there was something that was driving me further out in to the nothing. the big empty, as they say. and also because the further out you went the rent got cheaper and cheaper and cheaper. i was paying $27 5 a month for a two-bed rom house with five acres of land on the edge of 29 palms, right where the sign said next service 100 miles. that's where the b
mountains and west of the rocky mountains to california. didn't include california. because california, as you know, was already a state. question was so critical because it had to do with the future of slavery, and the future of southern power in the nation. own by the entire nation inspect 1857, the dread scott decision. the united states supreme court affirmed the southern constitutional view. republicans in contrast csh no matter the supreme court republicans would allow slaves in any territory. lincoln was elected in november of 1860, a month later the united states congress came in to session, members of congress put forth various comprises, a critical portion of all in some deal with the division of the territory. most often there was a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line west ward beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. i'm going get to my main topic. why lincoln rejected all meaningful comprise, which meant the territories. i'm going talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them, all of you know his name. abraham linco
. the first amendment applies to public colleges, not private. and the california it permits the standards but private universities are bound. yale and harvard promise freedom of speech to cooling language and those are forcible contracts in massachusetts and in new york. not just legally enforceable but the moral power. from columbia and harvard and yale you do not like being called out for violating their own promises. america has been more shoulder shrugging about it and it is good to step up the argument but you hold them against their own values and people know those are wrong. it is a harder fight. >> i am also said american university and however violated free-speech in the that as of model codes from the first amendment? >> we rate colleges with the system i came up with when it was still a little organization for red light no light or agreed night. these university is really bad the others may say it may not stand up anchor but it is not the worst. is we have 16 green light colleges right now. that is all. that is a little disturbing. but they include dartmouth for example. dartmo
his doctorate from the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a vary of -- variety of rock bands. he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppen wolf among other performers for those old enough to remember them. his first film, "rocking the wall," began airing on pbs this week and will continue throughout this year. dr. schweikart serves on the faculty at the university of dayton where he has taught business, economic history as well as military history. he is the author of more than a dozen books including, first, "a patriot's history of the united states," which he co-authored. other topics on which he has written include national defense, history and histography and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon "patriot's history of the united states" is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's v. of the modern world -- version of the modern world." please join me in welcoming larry schweikart.
. i think a lot of it has to do with -- i think people were more shocked by the riot in california. the riot in l.a. tell us about that. how does it really change the black movement? or just the way people perceive civil rights? i guess another way of putting it. what does it do to black community, to white liberalism. what happens with watts? >> guest: to white liberalism, what it does is -- a number of white liberals were shoulder-to-shoulder with blacks in the south, some were killed. after watts a lot of them sat back and said, hmm, these guys, they're not christ like nonviolent civil rights people. they're hoodlums. they're burning -- burn, baby, burn, they're bad people, fighting the police, and burning down buildings. and so this sort of makes a lot of white people cautious and not really sure what is happening here. and they don't like what they see. i'm not a saying that they give up on freedom struggle. johnson doesn't give up on in the freedom struggle. he continues to try to get legislation after this. although initially he is staggered by this how much could this happe
was the vietnamese in california who are there in huge numbers. they've now migrated from los angeles up towards san francisco, just like in miami in a way, there's -- the san jose mercury, a famous old newspaper is, there is now a viet-mercury. unfortunately, i couldn't speak vietnamese, and i couldn't read the paper either. i mean, just not even close. to ours. and then i heard about the following fact about miami: miami seems to be the only city in the whole world in which people from another country with another language and a very different culture took over at the voting machine a big, metropolitan area in just over i would say, slightly over one generation. i'm talking about the cubans. we have a havana-born gentleman here to my right, and so i said i've just got to go, i've got to go see what this is all about. i knew so little -- i still thought that the great industry was tourism in miami. and then i found out that for some time it's been shipping, including shipping that made the miami federal reserve bank have more cash than all the rest of the federal reserve banks put together. but now
for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this republic is also not going to last forever. i don't know if that is true because we don't know the future and i will stick with john adams it's rare to last forever and i went to try to make it that way. [applause] >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. joining us now in the studio is malcolm, the founder and the chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum. very quickly, what is the ameri
where stanford california is and i went to berkeley to get away from stanford. i study political theory and then i was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant why was a student, robert, who at that time, he brought in and worked there for a while. i guess the rest is in history but anyway, that's a bit of early backer spent and i want to get in this comment from jill. jill tweets in, what influence do you think mr. hitchens writing had on shaping women's history in america and the world? >> i'm not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously a bloke i have a new. he was absolutely, he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote a piece for "vanity fair," why women aren't funny. at it was one more assignment and he wrote it. and if you actually read it, it doesn't actually, the article doesn't say what the title might imply. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man, and so loved by women. he was very charismatic. women adored him, but he didn't let the sexual card at all. so i don't know what, i don't know if he has a place in quote women's hi
for our guest here in miami is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on booktv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. .. >> guest: well, first of all, thank you. that really feels great. you know, writing a book like this, it's a challenge writing about the bailout, and what i really tried to do was to make it accessible and understandable, and when i had the job in washington, special inspector general, that was the montra. i called it t.a.r.p. 101, it was put out so the american taxpayers, those paying for the program could really understand what was going on. it was the goal so it feels particularly good to hear the really kind comments that you just said. as far as the next book, i'm sort of recovering from this book. i really did it as a first time author, i did enjoy the process, and i really -- it was something that was, you know, you never know when you go on add veepture or journey in producing a book what it will be like, i am interested in writing something else, but i have not seen the topic to sink teeth into, but i want to write a seg boo
and republican legislators. prominent include roy ashburn former california state senator and activist and larry craig former u.s. senator from idaho, and activist and ted haggard evangelical pastor and activists. [applause] we will do a couple more. donald trump. donald trump might be in the book. >> we do have the entry for. [laughter] >> akin asked why we put it in there. >> any individual at a bar, party or other social function as having more fun than you. [laughter] they also include those who are dating attractive women, make more money than you or manage to handle everything life throws at them with composure. they often have great loving families, use proper grammar, and about wines, exercise regularly, make wise financial decisions, donate to charities and read looks. people have their lives together in the onion world are asked holes. >> yes, at best. >> newt gingrich. that guy doesn't exists. lebron james. how about basketball? [laughter] or we can do michael jordan. would you like to hear michael jordan or basketball? let's do michael jordan. reid michael jordan. jordan, michael, ga
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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